The quality of life in Australia

/ / Life in Australia

quality of life in australiaAustralia is one of the most sought-after emigration destinations in the world. It’s no surprise when you consider the superb quality of life in Australia.

We’re talking about more than the beautiful beaches, magnificent scenery and diverse wildlife here. The Organisation for Economic Coorporation and Development (OECD) measures quality of life with these metrics:

  1. Income
  2. Working hours
  3. Education
  4. Sense of community
  5. Air and water quality
  6. Life satisfaction
  7. Life expectancy

It just so happens that Australia scores well on all metrics.

1. Income

Australians earn USD49,126 per year on average with the average household net wealth estimated at USD427,064. The latter is higher than the OECD average of USD408, 376.

However, looking at disposable income is going to give you a more realistic picture of how far your money is going to go in Australia.

Here the OECD finds that the average household net-adjusted disposable income per capita is USD32 759 a year. This is slightly less than the OECD average of USD33 604 a year.

2. Working hours

In Australia, 13% of employees work long hours regularly. This is above the OECD average of 11% .

With that being said, full-time workers in Australia still spend 60% of their day on average, or 14.4 hours, on personal care and leisure activities like socialising with friends, hobbies or sports.

3. Education

Australia is one of the biggest education spenders among OECD countries. The country spend the eight highest proportion of its gross domestic product on primary to tertiary educational institutions.

At tertiary level education, Australia spend US15,556 per student and around a third of the total spending is allocated to research and development.

When it comes to the students themselves, students scored higher than the OECD average in reading and science but not significantly different from the OECD average in mathematics. Overall, Australian students scored similar to students in Germany, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the United States.

Looking at tertiary education, Australia also scored high. The OECD found that 81% of adults aged 25-64 have completed upper secondary education, higher than the OECD average of 78%.

4. Sense of community

The majority of Australians say there is a strong sense community in the area they live in. In fact, 95% of Australians believe they know someone they could rely on in a time of need.

5. Air and water quality

The level of air pollutants small enough to enter and cause damage to human lungs is 5.2 micrograms per cubic metre. This is substantially lower than the OECD average of 13.9 micrograms per cubic metre.

When it comes to the quality of Australia’s water, 93% of Australians say they are satisfied with the quality of their water. This is again much higher than the OECD average, which sits at 81%.

6. Life satisfaction

Life satisfaction is not just how happy Australians are in the moment but it is instead how satisfied people are with life in general. When asked to rate their general satisfaction with life on a scale from 0 to 10, Australian on average gave it a 7.3 grade. This is higher than the OECD average of 6.5.

7. Life expectancy

From birth, the average life expectancy in Australia is 83 years of age, which is three years older than the OECD average.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics also keeps data of life expectancy and breaks it down by gender. In 2016 to 2018, life expectancy at birth was 80.7 years for men and 84.9 for women. In the past 10 years, life expectancy has increased for both men and women.

Does the quality of life in Australia sound appealing?

If the quality of life in Australia sounds appealing and you’d like to explore the possibility of living in Australia, be sure to give us a call to discuss your options.

Our immigration agents are licensed and registered with MARA, so you can be sure of having your chances assessed accurately and getting the correct emigration advice.

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