Skilled Migration Points Assessment - Determine if you are eligible for migration to Australia

Are you applying for a subclass 189, 190 or 489 skilled migration visa? Then you'll have to complete a skilled migration points assessment.

When must I do the skilled migration points assessment?

The skilled migration points assessment is the first step in your migration. It should be done prior to the Expression of Interest.

Getting an assessment done

There are two options available to you for getting your assessment done:

  1. You can do the assessment yourself with one of the many free tools that are available online.
  2. You can enlist the services of an Australian immigration expert.

The choice is yours, but here is our advice:

The assessment is the most important step in your emigration, so it is important to do it right to get the correct points score.

Unfortunately it is very easy to get the points score wrong when you do it on your own. Australian immigration legislation get very confusing very quickly!

Getting a professional with expert immigration knowledge to help you is a much better idea.

You must note the following though to ensure you get help from the right experts:

  1. Only deal with licensed immigration agents. Intergate Emigration has a fully licensed agent - Katrin Maja O'Flynn. You can view her details on the official Migration Agents Authority website here.
  2. Do not be fooled by Australian DIBP Offshore ID numbers. These numbers are not a sign of an agent outside of Australia being licensed or having the backing of the Australian government. A DIBP number is issued for administrative purposes only to agents outside of Australia. In short, the agent you're dealing with is not registered and are not backed by MARA.

The golden rule? If you cannot find an agent on the MARA website, do not deal with them.

Book your assessment right here and now.

What does the skilled migration points assessment cover?

PART 1 – Age

18 – 25 25
25 – 32 30
32 – 39 25
40 – 44 15
45 – 49 0


PART 2 – English language

Superior English - IELTS 8 or more in all 4 components or OET ‘A pass’ 20
Proficient English - IELTS 7 or more in all 4 components or OET ‘B pass’ 10
Threshold English: Competent English (IELTS 6 or more in all 4 components or certain passport holders) 0


PART 3 – Overseas employment experience

36 months (3 years) in the last 10 years 5
60 months (5 years) in the last 10 years 10
96 months (8 years) in the last 10 years 15


PART 4 – Australian employment experience

Points are available if an applicant has worked in Australia in their nominated occupation or closely related skilled occupation as follows:

12 months (1 year) in the last 10 years.
36 months (3 years) in the last 10 years 10 60 months (5 years) in the last 10 years 15 96 months (8 years) in the last 10 years 20


PART 5 – Aggregating points for Australian and overseas work experience

A maximum of 20 points can be awarded for a combination of Australian and overseas work experience.

PART 6 – Australian professional year

5 points are awarded if the applicant has completed a professional year in Australia, in the applicant’s nominated occupation or closely related occupation.

PART 7 – Educational qualifications

Points are awarded for the completion of qualifications either through an Australian educational institution or an overseas qualification for which the Minister is satisfied is of a recognised standard:

Doctorate (PhD) – Australian institution or recognised overseas institution 20
Bachelor degree or higher – Australian institution or recognised overseas institution 15
Diploma – Australian institution 10
Trade certificate – Australian institution 10
Qualification or award recognised by the relevant assessing authority for the applicant’s nominated occupation 10

Applicants only receive points for their highest single qualification – it is not possible to claim points for more than one qualification under this part.

Australian qualifications usually attract points without further inquiry. Qualifications can attract points even if they are not closely related to the applicant's nominated occupation.

PART 8 – Australian study

Applicants who have met the two-year Australian study requirement  can obtain 5 points.

PART 9 – Credentialed community language

NAATI-accredited translators and interpreters at the paraprofessional (level 2) or higher are eligible for 5 points. A list of languages is not specified, so by implication any language assessed by NAATI at the paraprofessional level or higher should be acceptable.

PART 10 – Study in a regional or low-population growth metropolitan area of Australia

Criteria are:

  • Applicant meets the 2-year Australian study requirement;
  • Studies were conducted at a campus in regional Australia or a low-population growth metropolitan area;
  • Applicant lived in in regional Australia or a low-population growth metropolitan area  during the study;
  • None of the studies was via distance education.
5

The relevant regional areas are all parts of Australia, excluding: greater Brisbane area, the Gold Coast, Newcastle, the Central Coast, Sydney, Wollongong, Melbourne metropolitan area, Perth and surrounding areas and the Australian Capital Territory.

PART 11 – Partner skill

Applicant’s spouse or defacto partner:

  • Is an applicant for the same GSM visa subclass;
  • Is not an Australian permanent resident or citizen;
  • Was under 50 at the time of invitation to apply for the visa;
  • Nominated a skilled occupation at the time of invitation to apply for the visa;
  • Had a suitable skills assessment in their occupation at time of invitation to apply for the visa; and
  • Had competent English at the time of invitation to apply for the visa.
5


PART 12 – State or Territory nomination

The factors below only applies to the subclass 190 visa.

  • The applicant has been invited to apply for the visa by a State or Territory government; and
  • The nomination has not been withdrawn by the State or Territory government.
5

PART 13 – Designated area sponsorship

This part applies to applicants for a Skilled – Regional Sponsored (Provisional) (subclass 489). Schedule 6D provides:

  • The applicant has been invited to apply for the visa by a State or Territory government; and
  • The nomination has  not been withdrawn by the State or Territory government.
10
  • The applicant has been sponsored by a relative usually resident in a designated area; and
  • The sponsorship has been accepted by the Minister.
10
MARN number
Trusted

MARA Licensed Agents

Our immigration agent is licensed by MARA, giving you complete peace of mind during your migration.

Get your FREE initial assessment here

Go

Get in touch

South Africa +27 (0) 21 202 8200

UK +44 (0) 2038 732150

Germany +49 (0) 896 987 13

Still haven't booked your assessment? Don't push the pause button on your dream! Get an assessment done today.

Our latest blog posts

New visa for parents of Australian migrants in 2019Read more +30 November 2018 By Immigration to Australia in News, Our latest posts

New visa for parents of Australian migrants in 2019

Migrants to Australia will be delighted to learn that Australia is introducing a Temporary Sponsored Parent visa in 2019. This visa will present parents and grandparents with a new pathway to reunite with families. More about this visa The Temporary Sponsored Parent visa will allow parents to visit their families in Australia for a continuous
invitation to apply for australian visaRead more +05 November 2018 By Immigration to Australia in Immigration to Australia, Our latest posts

What is the Invitation to Apply for an Australian visa?

There are many parts to general skilled migration visa applications. One of these parts is the Invitation to Apply for an Australian visa. Continue reading to find out what it is and where it fits into the process. What is the Invitation to Apply? The Invitation to Apply is as the name suggests – an
truths about emigratingRead more +02 November 2018 By Immigration to Australia in Immigration to Australia, Our latest posts

4 Uncomfortable truths about emigrating – Plus the good news

It’s no secret that emigrating is a huge undertaking. Especially if you’re a family doing it! However, most people entering the emigration process do not fully realise what lies ahead. Is it worth it? Of course! You’re opening doors to new opportunities and a better life for yourself and your family. But how do you
TOP